News 30th October 2015

Sports Integrity Briefs – 30 Oct. 2015

• Athlete jailed for murder involvement: Montenegro has sentenced former athlete Damir Mandic to a 19-year prison term for his involvement in the 2004 murder of Dusko Jovanovic, Editor of Dan newspaper, reports the Organised Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP). It is understood that Mandic considers he has been set up, and is considering an appeal.


• Former chess World Champion banned: The World Chess Federation (FIDE) has announced that it has banned former World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov and former FIDE General Secretary Ignatius Leong for holding any position in the sport for two years. The decision by FIDE’s Ethics Commission comes after it found the two guilty of violating the Federation’s Code of Ethics. Following media allegations and the publication of an official agreement, it was alleged that Kasparov, in his bid to become President of FIDE last year, made a deal with Leong to pay him USD$500,000 to ensure that Singapore supported Kasparov’s candidacy.


• Ex-AFL player seeks further supplements documents: A former Australian Football League (AFL) player is taking legal action to force his old club, Essendon, and the AFL, to disclose documents outlining the supplements he was administered as a player there. According to reports, Hal Hunter’s lawyers allege that both the club and league breached their duty of careand that Hunter ‘did not know what was exactly in the substances injected into him.’

Both Essendon and AFL have rejected that there are ground for a claim, with both organisations’ lawyers saying that they had already ‘handed over a great many documents’ to Hunter’s legal team. In March Hunter was revealed as the AFL player seeking to sue Essendon and the AFL in connection with the club’s supplements programme, which led to 34 past and present players facing doping charges.


• Malaysian football announces Sportradar partnership: The Football Association of Malaysia (FAM) has announced that it has launched a partnership with the sports data technology and services provider, Sportradar. Sportradar provides betting monitoring services to a number of sports federations worldwide, including World Rugby and UEFA. However, according to reports, the partnership does not include Sportradar’s betting pattern monitoring service. Betting monitorting was not mentioned in FAM’s announcement of the deal.

Last month Reuters reported that the president of the Malaysian football champions, Tunku Ismail, called on FIFA to investigate the country’s football governing body for corruption and criminal activity. At the time Ismail allegedly also urged FAM to employ Sportradar to monitor betting patterns for signs of match-fixing at football matches.


• Rugby league side sack doping player: English rugby league side Keighley Cougars have released Daley Williams from his contract after UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) imposed a four-year suspension on Williams. Williams tested positive for a number of banned substances following an out-of-competition test by UKAD on 5 March 2015.


• Columbian cyclist tests positive: The US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has announced that professional cyclist Oscar Tovar has accepted a two-year suspension for a doping offence. Tovar tested positive for testosterone following an in-competition urine sample on 17 May 2015. Testosterone is a prohibited substance under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing, which follows the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) International Standard for Testing.


• Argentinian footballer admits tax fraudJavier Mascherano, a professional footballer for the Spanish side Barcelona, has reportedly admitted two accounts of fraud totaling more than €1.5 million. According to the BBC, the footballer admitted the charge in a court appearance in Gava, near Barcelona. Mascherano is alleged to have attempted to conceal earnings from his image rights by using foreign-owned companies. In a separate case, Barcelona’s Lionel Messi, is reportedly set to stand trial alongside his father for a similar account of tax fraud totaling €4.16 million.

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