Press releases 22nd November 2017

Kristen Worley to present her case at Play The Game

Kristen Worley is to present her human rights case against sport’s regulations on transitioning athletes at Play The Game 2017 in Eindhoven on Tuesday 28 November. On 18 July, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario recognised that policies originating from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had infringed the rights of Worley, potentially opening the doors for hundreds of other athletes to stake their claim before a court of law, outside of sport’s closed judicial system.

Worley and Andy Brown, Editor of The Sports Integrity Initiative, will outline how policies originating with the IOC’s Stockholm Consensus were not based on science. Worley and Brown will also outline how despite overwhelming scientific evidence, sport is still today attempting to argue that natural (endogenous) testosterone levels are the primary driver of sporting performance.

The presentation will also outline how policies based on this myth have resulted in hundreds of female athletes being declared ineligible, medically harmed and their sexuality called into question – simply for something their body naturally produces. It will include some high profile examples, as well as a few horror stories, illustrating how important Worley’s case is in getting sport to recognise that the rights of athletes have been infringed. They will be followed by Brendan Schwab, Executive Director of the World Players Association, who will outline the implications that Worley’s case has for the rights of athletes in sport.

For a detailed outline of Worley’s case, click here. As preparation for the presentation, Worley and Brown will cycle the 140 kilometres from Hoek van Holland to Eindhoven for the opening of Play The Game, which takes place from 26-29 November. Worley is an ex-professional cyclist and diversity advisor. Brown is a journalist…

A full programme for Play The Game is available here. High profile speakers include:

• Hassan Al Thawadi, Secretary General of the Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, which is the local organising committee for the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar;
• Sir Craig Reedie, President of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA);
• Dick Pound, IOC Member & WADA’s founding President;
• Richard McLaren, who produced the Independent Person (IP) Reports into systemic Russian doping for WADA;
• Hajo Seppelt, German investigative journalist.

The Sports Integrity Initiative will post regular updates from Play The Game. To stay informed on developments throughout the conference, follow The Sports Integrity Initiative on Twitter, and also the #PTG2017 hashtag.

Follow this story

Read other articles from this story stream...

News 27th July 2015 - 18 days ago

CAS suspends IAAF’s Hyperandrogenism Regulations

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) today suspended the International Association of Athletics Federations’ (IAAF) Hyperandrogenism Regulations for a maximum of two years, as the IAAF was unable to provide scientific evidence about the degree of performance advantage enjoyed by hyperandrogenic female athletes. During the hearing of Dutee Chand’s appeal against the validity of …
News 29th February 2016 - 16 days ago

Ontario Court to hear IOC’s attempt to nix human rights case

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice will today hear the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) attempt to prevent elite cyclist Kristen Worley’s case arguing that sport’s rules on gender have medically damaged her from being heard in the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO). The International Olympic Committee (IOC) argues that the HRTO has no jurisdiction …
Features 12th June 2015 - 3 days ago

Sport’s gender policies: an affront to human rights

The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario recently accepted a landmark case, which could not only change the way in which sport polices gender, but could also have ramifications for sport’s requirement that all disputes be settled through arbitration at the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Kristen Worley (pictured), an elite Canadian cyclist, spoke to the …
Features 26th May 2017 - 19 days ago

Sport’s longest injustice scheduled for demolition

In a small room within the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on 24 May, Canadian cyclist Kristen Worley began the process of correcting what could be the biggest and longest-running injustice in sport. In its attempt to fit all athletes into ‘male’ and ‘female’ categories, sport has for the last 40 years prevented athletes born …
Features 20th September 2016 - 25 days ago

TUE inequality: Sloan Teeple’s testosterone story

Thanks to Fancy Bears, athlete use of Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) has been a bit of a hot topic recently. Documents relating to elite athlete use of TUEs have been illegally accessed from the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS). As such, the context in which they were issued is not …
Features 14th April 2016 - 1 day ago

The role of sport in recognising transgender and intersex rights

Sport is an integral part of the culture of almost every nation and its ability to shape perceptions and influence public opinion should not be underestimated. The United Nations has highlighted the potential for using sport in reducing discrimination and inequality, specifically by empowering girls and women. Research indicates that the benefits of sport include enhancing health and well-being, …
Features 24th February 2016 - 21 days ago

Transgender Guidelines: an attempt to ‘dead cat’ debate on gender

In November 2015, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) published its Transgender Guidelines within a Consensus Statement following a ‘Consensus meeting on sex reassignment and hyperandrogegism’. The Guidelines are intended to replace the 2003 Stockholm Consensus, which required transgender athletes to undergo surgical anatomical changes and hormonal therapy in order to compete in female competition. The …
Opinion 19th August 2016 - 26 days ago

So what if some female Olympians have high testosterone?

On August 12, Dutee Chand became just the second female sprinter to represent India at the Olympic Games. Her road to Rio has been anything but easy. In 2014, the International Association of Athletic Federations banned her from competition on the grounds that her body naturally produced too much testosterone, a condition called hyperandrogenism. It wasn’t …
Features 20th April 2016 - 25 days ago

Testosterone is not exclusively a male hormone

Testosterone is not exclusively a male hormone. It is produced in significant quantities by males and females - especially by elite athletes, who need it to aid muscle growth and recovery. The reason this drum needs banging, yet again, is because there has recently been speculation that Caster Semenya (pictured) is running faster not because …
Features 24th July 2017 - 21 days ago

Athlete health and fair play: Kristen Worley case puts women’s sport policy in the dock

Since the advent of sex-testing female athletes in 1968, international sport organisations have been wrangling with the underlying purpose, efficacy and impact of efforts to ensure that 'real women' were in competition. This was not merely about the very unlikely prospect of men masquerading as women in sport. Rather, sex-testing has been predicated on a fear that some …
Features 28th July 2017 - 17 days ago

Kristen Worley's case commits sport to accommodating gender diversity

“This is not really about gender at all”, says Kristen Worley, “it’s part of a much bigger push in global sport towards diversity and inclusion”. ‘This’ is Worley’s human rights application with Cycling Canada, the Ontario Cycling Association and Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), seeking to change the policies and guidelines around XY female athletes, hormone therapy …
News 18th July 2017 - 27 days ago

Cycling Canada, Ontario Cycling Association, the UCI and Canadian athlete Kristen Worley settle human rights application to promote inclusive sporting environments

Kristen Worley has settled her human rights application with Cycling Canada, the Ontario Cycling Association and Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). Worley sought changes to the policies, guidelines, rules and processes surrounding XY female athletes, gender verification and therapeutic use of required hormones that are captured by anti-doping regulations. "Today, I am satisfied that the sport of Cycling …
Features 7th August 2017 - 8 days ago

Worley’s case opens the courts to athlete human rights cases

On 18 July, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario recognised that policies originating from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had infringed the human rights of Canadian cyclist Kristen Worley. Whilst the agreement recognises that sport’s unsubstantiated policies have needlessly harmed XY female athletes, its real significance is that it could allow other athletes whose human …
News 22nd November 2017 - 23 days ago

Kristen Worley to present her case at Play The Game

Kristen Worley is to present her human rights case against sport’s regulations on transitioning athletes at Play The Game 2017 in Eindhoven on Tuesday 28 November. On 18 July, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario recognised that policies originating from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) had infringed the rights of Worley, potentially opening the doors …

You may also like...

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This