Press releases 30th November 2017

IOC sanctions two athletes for failing anti-doping tests at London 2012

The protection of clean athletes and the fight against doping are top priorities for the International Olympic Committee (IOC), as outlined in Olympic Agenda 2020, the IOC’s strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement. Following the findings of the completed Independent Person Report in December 2016, the IOC has examined all samples collected from Russian athletes during the Olympic Games London 2012. These re-analyses and subsequent disciplinary hearings are now over.

As part of this process, the IOC today announced that two additional Russian athletes have been disqualified from the Olympic Games London 2012. The details follow.

Anna Nazarova, 31, of the Russian Federation, competing in the women’s long jump event in which she ranked 5th and for which she was awarded a diploma, has been disqualified from the Olympic Games London 2012. Re-analysis of Nazarova’s samples from London 2012 resulted in a positive test for the prohibited substance dehydrochlormethyltestosterone (turinabol).

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for this case of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mrs Gunilla Lindberg and Dr Ugur Erdener, decided the following:

  1. The Athlete, Anna Nazarova:
    1. is found to have committed an anti-doping rule violation pursuant to the IOC Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London in 2012 (presence, and/or use, of Prohibited Substances or its Metabolites or Markers in an athlete’s bodily specimen),
    2. is disqualified from the event in which she participated upon the occasion of the Olympic Games London 2012, namely the women’s long jump event, in which she ranked 5th and for which she was awarded a diploma,
    3. has the diploma obtained in the women’s long jump event withdrawn and is ordered to return the same.
  2. The IAAF is requested to modify the results of the above-mentioned event accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.
  3. The Russian Olympic Committee shall ensure full implementation of this decision.
  4. The Russian Olympic Committee shall notably secure the return to the IOC, as soon as possible, of the diploma awarded in connection with the women’s long jump event to the Athlete.
  5. This decision enters into force immediately.

The full decision is available here.

Yulia Gushchina, 34, of the Russian Federation, competing in the women’s 400m event in which she ranked 15th, and competing in the women’s 4x400m relay event in which she ranked 2nd,, for which she and her teammates ranked 2nd and for which they were awarded a silver medal, has been disqualified from the Olympic Games London 2012. Re-analysis of Gushchina’s samples from London 2012 resulted in a positive test for the prohibited substances dehydrochlormethyltestosterone (turinabol) and stanozolol.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for this case of Mr Denis Oswald (Chairman), Mrs Gunilla Lindberg and Dr Ugur Erdener, decided the following:

  1. The Athlete, Yulia Gushchina:
    1. is found to have committed an anti-doping rule violation pursuant to the IOC Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London in 2012 (presence and/or use, of a Prohibited Substance or its Metabolites or Markers in an athlete’s bodily specimen),
    2. is disqualified from the events in which she participated upon the occasion of the Olympic Games London 2012, in particular the women’s 400m event and the women’s 4x400m relay event;
  2. The IAAF is requested to modify the results of the women’s 400m (1) accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.
  3. The Russian Olympic Committee shall ensure full implementation of this decision (2).

The full decision is available here.

Out of the 226 samples collected from Russian athletes who participated to the Olympic Games London 2012 that were re-analysed, 21 sanctions have been issued by the disciplinary commission. The IOC’s re-analysis programme for London 2012 samples is ongoing. To date, 584 samples from athletes who participated in the Olympic Games London 2012 (including Russian athletes) have been re-analysed and 49 Anti-Doping Rule violations were found.

One of them is Nevin Yavit (TUR), who participated in the women’s 100m hurdles event at the Olympic Games London 2012, in which she ranked 5th and for which she was awarded a diploma. The result of the re-analysis of the A sample constitutes an Adverse Analytical Finding as it showed the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or marker.

The IOC was informed of the decision made with regard to the application of the IAAF Anti-Doping Regulation, according to which all the athlete’s results from 28 June 2012 to the start of a four-year ineligibility period were annulled, and therefore decided to not proceed further with the case. In applying Art. 15.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code, the IOC has recognised this above decision and acknowledged the fact that the results obtained by the athlete at the Olympic Games London 2012 had already been annulled.

The annulment consequently leads to the correction of the results and the return of the diploma. The IAAF has already corrected the results accordingly. In order to complete the implementation of the consequences of the annulment, the athlete has been requested to return immediately to the IOC or to the Turkish Olympic Committee the diploma awarded to her in connection with the above-mentioned Olympic event.

The Turkish Olympic Committee has been required to assist the IOC in securing the implementation of the above. For further details, please consult the following factsheet.

(1) The results of the relay event have already been modified as a result of the decision issued in the matter of Ms Antonina Krivoshapka.

(2) The consequences of the disqualification of the team results shall be implemented based on the decision issued in the matter of Ms Antonina Krivoshapka.

• This media release was originally published by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on 30 November 2017. To access the original, please click here.

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